Livin' life and LOVING IT!!!!
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Reblogged from whispertohappiness  93,508 notes

jas0nwaterfalls:

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:

can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode? 

It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.

Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.

Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.

Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.

Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.

The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.

The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

pretty incredible

Reblogged from megacdubsus  405,854 notes

pleasantandcain:

the-name-of-stone:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

cell-mate:

crackerhell:

ethanwearsprada:

i think it’s a universal truth that everyone in our generation takes pluto’s losing its planetary status as a personal offense

yes

pluto is smaller than russia. why did we ever even consider it a planet?

BECAUSE IT’S A PART OF OUR SOLAR SYSTEM

OHANA MEANS FAMILY

FAMILY MEANS NO ONE IS LEFT BEHIND

OR FORGOTTEN.


OR REVOKED OF PLANETARY STATUS.

Reblogged from megacdubsus  9,457 notes
  • Topic:

    DIVERSITY IN THE MARVEL UNIVERSE

  • Anthony Mackie:

    We’re in a day and age where kids deserve someone they can look up to. I’m very proud of Scarlett with what she’s been able to do with Black Widow, and how little girls can sit back and see that she doesn’t have to have superpowers, she’s just a badass. While being cool and a chick. And I like the fact that little brown kids can say, ‘hey, the Falcon is there now’, and little green kids can say, ‘the Hulk’s there’. Don’t want to leave out the Martians. I think it’s very important, and I think Marvel has been at the forefront of that, giving people the opportunity to represent every aspect of culture. It’s definitely something that was on the table, and on my mind when I decided to sign on to this project.

  • Topic:

    FANS COMPLAINING ABOUT CASTING ON GROUNDS OF RACE

  • Anthony Mackie:

    Superman, black would be the coolest dude in the world. Imagine Sam Jackson in a cape. Running around. That would be a good movie.

  • I think what a lot of people don’t get is, these people aren’t real. If you cast a black dude as John F Kennedy, that’s wrong. If you cast a white dude as Martin Luther King, that’s wrong. These people aren’t real. The suits aren’t real. There aren’t really superheroes in the world.

  • At some point in time, you have to steep yourself in reality and say, ‘hey, it’s not about what they look like, it’s about casting a good actor in the role. If you’re sitting at home and you can’t see a black guy as Nick Fury, maybe there’s something wrong with you.